Creative Generosity Builds Communities

Help-Portrait, an annual photography event, commemorated their eighth year December 5th, 2015. Though not an official Help-Portrait event, New Haven’s Mothers For Justice group members were invited to participate in a holiday portrait event the same day, organized by photojournalist volunteer, Margaret Wage, with the idea of giving back.

Help-Portrait was founded by celebrity photographer Jeremy Cowart and Kyle Chowning in 2008. Their mission is to empower photographers, hairstylists and makeup artists to use their skills, tools and expertise to give back to their local community.

The Mothers For Justice (MFJ) is a grass-roots women’s advocacy group that seeks to support one another and empower themselves and their families to improve their lives and their communities. MFJ was founded in 1933 and is dedicated to using their collective voice to change the systems that perpetuate poverty and injustice. Our issues and concerns are Welfare Reform, Prison Re-entry, Housing, Healthcare & Domestic Violence among many other things. A similarity MFJ shares with the Help-Portrait community is they both recognize giving back to the local community is one way to effect positive change.

There are great folks working with organizations year-round to make things better for those in need. Ginger Grant, a.k.a. Ginger Lee Originals, is a Connecticut art photographer and sees art as a way to enrich those living in Bristol, CT. Grant recently opened  The Studio, an art studio space where she hosts painting, stitching, stamping and numerous craft project classes. What’s the connection between creativity and hunger, you might ask. For Grant, the connection lies in building up an underserved community where residents might not have even considered taking a pencil or brush to paper to express feelings or life perspective. Grant advocates any growth must first come from willingness to try. It’s only then that a person can see possibility and from that, change can occur.

In October The Studio hosted a ‘Photo Feel Good’ event, inviting the public at large to have a photograph made, free of charge, and like Help-Portrait, a print was made and given to each participant. Nearby business neighbor Marisela Severino of Joamar Hair Salon volunteered her salon and services for the all day event. A photo session included  make-up by Dori Green and contributed to making each person ‘Feel Good’ for the occasion. Grant collected (business attire) clothing  donations and  in turn, participants selected  whatever they needed for a job interview. Sweaters, blouses, dresses, slacks, jackets and winter coats were made available free to take home. That generosity of spirit is what creativity is about.

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Many who attended were inspired as conversations began and people opened up about their situations. Some attendees were in transitional housing and the access to free clothing was appreciated as they took the time visit each table-full of gently used garments and racks of formal wear that were placed on hangers throughout The Studio. The clothing that remained was donated to Christian Fellowship Center on Prospect St. in Bristol.

Merryl Eaton, of MFJ, was gracious and allowed the use of the building space to do portraits. Eaton organizes monthly MFJ meetings and keeps members aware of legislative events for MFJ to attend and speak to issues they wish to impact.

Surprisingly, half the people who signed up didn’t come due to lack of transportation. The following images are of the members that came, some with their family. With hope and the strength that comes from support networks such as these, changes for the better can be made.

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Photography Tradition Endures Through Generations

There’s no time like the present to do what you love. Years ago that sentiment became a popular catch phrase following the book  publication, “Do what you love and the money will follow,” by Marsha Sinetar. The idea to pursue a life passion as a career choice seems a no brainer to finding job satisfaction.

Jay Misencik’s career choice was influenced by uncle Ed Brinsko (1927-1995,) a photojournalist and lifelong Bridgeport resident who worked for The Post Publishing Co., (CT Post).

In January 2015 Jay Misencik and partner Geralene Valentine, both self-employed photographers, and Brinsko’s son Ed Brinsko, assembled a month long Connecticut photo exhibit held at McLevy Hall in Bridgeport . The show titled, “ReVisit Bridgeport … Photographs by Ed Brinsko,” showcased Ed Brinsko’s work which spanned decades. Ed Brinsko and Misencik frequently accompanied Brinsko on assignment where they learned to develop film and print enlargements in the darkroom. Print and film processing is considered  a craft compared to digital photography with its ease of use and immediate results.

Ed Brinsko imagery for 'Revisit Bridgeport' exhibit. Photo courtesy by Jay Misencik

Ed Brinsko imagery for ‘Revisit Bridgeport’ exhibit.
Photo courtesy by Jay Misencik

The photos are stories unto themselves. Brinsko captured hard news, celebrities and street photography in a way that is both portrait and document. Michael Daly, Connecticut Post editorial page editor, presented a discussion on Brinsko’s work to a room at full capacity of retired news journalists and Bridgeport residents.

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January 2015 “ReVisit Bridgeport … Photographs by Ed Brinsko,” McLevy Hall in Bridgeport, CT

Analog photography is a longer process than digital photography. That’s what makes Brinsko’s images special. Brinsko didn’t have the luxury of seeing what the picture looked like immediately. His talent, his eye for capturing the right moment is evident in each image in the collection.

Standing room only at 'Revisit Bridgeport Photos by Ed Brinsko' talk during month long exhibit. © Margaret Waage Photography

Standing room only at ‘Revisit Bridgeport Photos by Ed Brinsko’ talk during month long exhibit. © Margaret Waage Photography

2014 Jay Misencik documents Bridgeport through photography projects. Miscenik and partner Geraline Valentine have spent twenty years photographing Bridegport in ‘Main Street Bridgeport’ and current ‘Bridgeport Portrait’ projects. © Margaret Waage Photography

Misencik and Valentine have documented Bridgeport for over twenty years beginning with ‘Main Street Bridgeport’ series and now, through their ‘Bridgeport Portrait Project’ series. Misencik like Brinsko, is interested in portraying those individuals who have spent time in Bridgeport. From office worker to outdoor laborer, Misencik says, “It’s the stories people tell that in turn, tell the story of a place.”

 

Misencik is interested in hearing from those who can share their memories of The Palace Theater, a cornerstone to culture in Bridgeport.

Misencik wishes to show something new by recounting recollections and in doing so, pay tribute to the idea of time and place in history. The Palace Theater remains a significant part of a changing neighborhood.

It’s the tradition of storytelling that Misencik and Valentine practice. “Whether shooting digital or analog photography, doesn’t matter as much as how one approaches an assignment,” said Misencik.

“Photography is more about practicing the craft of capturing a moment in time. Anticipating that is what makes a good photograph.” Ed Brinsko would have been proud.

Artists Honor Vets in Give Back Event

Ginger Grant shows family their portrait during 'Thank You Photo Shoot' event at Artist Tree Tea House & Gallery 156 in Bristol.

Ginger Grant shows Van Houten family their portrait during ‘Thank You Photo Shoot’ event at Artist Tree Tea House & Gallery 156 in Bristol.

If you do what you love enjoyment follows. That sentiment is the driving force behind the Artist Tree Tea House’s totally free ‘Thank You Photo Shoot,’ event held at the studio to honor veterans and their families.

Dori Green, proprietor of Bristol’s Artist Tree Tea House & Gallery 156, (ATTH&G156), sponsored the event in conjunction with volunteer photographers Ginger Grant of Ginger Lee Originals, G.L.O. Photography and Lynn Keeler Fisher, who is also a veteran.

The idea to pay it forward comes naturally to all three women, each of whom shared perspectives why they give their time and talents. Green, a relatively new entrepreneur in this brick and mortar space, brings a multitude of skills to her business, which opened in 2013. Green’s creativity encompasses painting, event production, catering, hairstylist, make-up and massage therapy.

ATTH&G156 brings Bristol and nearby surrounding towns a community-minded destination for arts and crafts exploration, a live venue for music performance and poetry readings and a cozy vintage styled tearoom with offerings of fine loose-leaf teas, coffee and sweet treats.

Additionally, lunches are served consisting of salads, wraps and hearty soups. ATTH&G156 is available to host receptions and business meetings.

Green is active in the Bristol Rising momentum and has advocated for improvements to the building to expand the rear outdoor space. Green hopes to accommodate yoga classes or meetings on the deck overlooking the Pequabuck River.

Dori Green applies a touch up to volunteer photographer and veteran Lynn Keeler Fisher on right.

Dori Green applies a touch up to volunteer photographer and veteran Lynn Keeler Fisher on right.

Ginger Grant’s work consists of jewelry design, fine art photography, painting and knitting arts. Grant’s unique hand made necklace and earring designs and photography are for sale in ATTH&G156.

Lynn Keeler Fisher is active in arts advocacy. Fisher’s photography of Hartford Artspace and Meriden Gallery 153 events touts each organization’s arts activities.

Lynn Keeler Fisher gives in to laughter during her turn at sitting for portrait.

Lynn Keeler Fisher gives in to laughter during her turn at sitting for portrait.

Three busy people recognize giving time nourishes the very creativity that feeds their spirits. Green worked as volunteer Massage Emergence Response Team (MERT), member during the 9/11 crisis through the American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) helping first responders cope with fatigue and exhaustion from hours of search and rescue efforts. “As objective a person could be, it stills upsets me remembering how disappointed rescue workers were after realizing they couldn’t get to people in time to save them.”

Grant describes photography as a life passion, “It gives me the chance to feel good giving back.” Choosing veterans to thank is an easy choice because they are the kind of people who put others before themselves.

For Fisher, volunteering for ‘Thank You Photo Shoot’ presented an opportunity to connect with veterans, to practice posing techniques and to have her own portrait taken, “Portrait photography is different than event photography.” Fisher chose to enlist in the Navy and served four years from 1978-1982.

During that time Fisher held Engineman status and worked as a diesel mechanic. “Most friends were just getting out of college when I returned from service. I travelled to Hawaii, Singapore, Somalia and Philippines. I never regretted the choice I made – it provided me with a solid education and great life experience,” said Fisher.

Ginger Grant photographs officers Jodie and Ken Fay who serve in CT Governors Horse Company and work with canine Comfort Dog Maggie of Christ The King LutheranChurch in Newtown, CT.

Ginger Grant photographs veterans Jodi and Ken Fay. Ken works with the CT Governor’s Horse Guard and both work with Comfort Dog Maggie of Christ The King Lutheran Church in Newtown, CT.

Green hopes more people will come to Artist Tree Tea House & Gallery 156 to check out the goings on there. “It’s all about creating opportunities to nourish the good within each of us.”

Lynn Keeler Fisher photographs Naval officer with family. Fisher also is a veteran and sat for photo.

Lynn Keeler Fisher photographs Travis Van Houten, Naval officer HM2, wife Ali and baby daughter Leah. Fisher, is also a veteran.

Flattered: Ten Questions with Margaret Waage

Recently I visited the Tumblr site and was surprised to see graphic content. I expect to see artsy content there, that’s what Tumblr is known for, but user be advised, especially if viewing at work! What’s great about sites like Tumblr is its variety from beautiful artwork to subversive works, and resourceful written works in between.

The Hungry Ghost Collective is aTumblr site that flattered me with feature ‘Ten Questions with Margaret Waage’ which is an interview format of and for photographers. It’s hard to be authoritative on something as ever-changing as photography, but what I discovered was it’s easy to talk about your own motivation to create. I take pictures to pay attention to life and the people in yours. It’s as simple as that…photography facilitates connection to the moment and what’s happening there. But the title of the blog Hungry Ghost Collective got me thinking about the hereafter.

What will come of all our collected memories after we are gone? Companies that cater to the rights of digital works have begun to enter the estate planning conversation. Digital assets are different from collections of negatives or prints. Once something publishes on the Internet it’s hard to control where it will appear through shares. Copyright will always be an issue, but until hyper vigilant measures for tracking and holding parties responsible are in full effect, content can appear in places the author did not intend.

One such company that provides a good roster of online services for digital estate planning is The Digital Beyond. For artists, photographers, writers, musicians or anyone who cares what happens to their stuff after their gone it’s worth looking taking a look.

Till then I’ll keep clicking!

Interior Windows – A Photographer’s View

Blizzard ‘Nemo‘ has taken the airwaves by (snow) storm. While sitting at home watching the news coverage on t.v., it seems to be a countdown of each snowflake and its effect. Granted, coverage of a weather system of this magnitude is a comfort to many, I haven’t heard any other news besides  weather.

Everybody is indoors except for reporters and part of the story involves all the closures, including businesses and quite possibly roads. Power outages and accidents are also part of the reporting hierarchy. The outside world is turning white! I’m focusing on interior life and in doing so, I remembered images I made a few weeks ago. Two windows are the subject of a photography exercise:

Select an object, it can be anything, and capture it in several views. Try different times of the day to explore lighting and try different lenses to ‘see’ what various focal lengths look like. It’s interesting to get an understanding of how ordinary objects look in a photograph – depending on the approach:_MG_4938

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Light Setting

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Pitfall or Preference in Art Collections – Let The Viewer Decide

If you were an artist and had a specific speciality you enjoyed creating, how do you think would be the best way to showcase that collection?

Would you worry over viewer response? Should a body of work be expressed via the artist’s intention and process or should the creator be concerned with a potential audience  experience? These are typical questions I asked myself after attending a exhibit “APISIDES’ by Branford, CT’s landscape photographer Fran McMullen.

The exhibit is being held at eatery Christopher Martins in New Haven, CT. What a great venue – good food and unpretentious atmosphere makes for a relaxing opportunity to take in artwork, conversation and eats.

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Aprides is described as, ‘The point of greatest or least distance of the orbit of a celestial body from its center of attraction.’ Looking at these magnificat landscapes that capture the beauty of a singular moment in time, namely the transition of light from day to night, or possibly the exact moment when dawn gives way to the banality of morning, my immediate response is I want to be there. I want to feel my body’s weight sinking, and making claim to the sand beneath my feet. I imagine the sounds and smells of sea air. Unmistakably and undeniably nature, a view of sky and water together, would inspire me to leave any worry I might be harboring aside in lieu of the moment that showed itself.

Nature photography or landscape, call it what you may, is a genre that calls into action so many elements. Timing, framing, color, light, composition… these qualities don’t just happen to line themselves up by chance.

That is what I appreciate about  McMullen’s collection. The subject matter is indeed a grouping of similar themes – outdoor views of a water based landscape filled with a reflective skylight, but that is where it ends. I know each image represents an ever changing day, an every changing moment in time. If you are the kind of person that one sunset satisfies, then you will surely miss the next. NO two are alike just as no two of anything are alike. You have to be open to seeing a hue, where a hint of difference is a world of difference.

To see more of Fran McMullen Photography and landscape work visit: http://franmcmullen.com/?page_id=2046 

Talent Or Luck: On Winning Fame Through Art Contests

To borrow the lotto saying, “You have to win it to be in it,” contests lure you in with that elusive hook…. you just might win, if only you played the game. For Lotto it surely is about luck when it comes to winning. What about when the contest asks something of the contestant besides just plopping down a few bucks for an admission fee?

When it comes to the arts, is it a game of odds or talent with contests that call for submitting  your photography, illustration, song writing, animation or any creative works? For ‘calls for submissions’ it’s more about the quality of work, and when it comes to art that can be subjective. But certainly a little luck wouldn’t hurt.

It is a journey of the unknown when anyone decides to submit work in the hopes of a nod from a judge, who usually is pro in the field.

“Wall’ Charlottsville, VA

Take the ‘One Life’ International Photography Competition underway right now. The judges are individuals from publishing and academia realms that include: Sarah Filipi, Deputy Photo Editor for Fast Company, Rebecca Kimmons, Photo Editor for Redbook, Michael Norseng, Photo Director for Esquire, John Gimenez Photo Contests & Events for Photo District News (PDN), Michael Stueven, Photo Editor for People, Rob Baid, Creative Director for Mother New York, and Steven J. Bliss, Dean of The School of Fine Arts at Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD).

While online art contests don’t award millions they do give participants a chance to be seen by industry professionals and could potentially open doors for freelance opportunities. The prizes for One Life are a $25,000 grant, a gallery exhibition, a feature in PDN Magazine, a photo essay in the One Life Catalogue, and lastly, web exposure to a global audience.

Signage points to freaks along board walk, Coney Island, New York.

Digital publishing has created a niche market for numerous web ‘call for submissions’ opportunities. While entry fees are associated with the contests, the dollar amount usually isn’t too steep. Some might consider these organizations as opportunists similar to a vanity gallery practice, by charging high fees for the privilege of exhibiting in the space. I don’t think online art contests fall into that category of simply making money off of participants.

Online or brick and mortar, it doesn’t much matter where the venue is – what matters is the costs associated with putting together an event of this magnitude. In today’s markets any business endeavor comes with some expense associated with marketing your work.

Another contest of note that is free to enter is the Smithsonian Magazine 10th Annual Photo Contest offering Grand Prize of a Smithsonian Journeys trip or cash equivalent of approximately $3,000,  five category winner prizes of $500 and one reader’s choice winner of $500.

The National Geographic Photo Contest 2012  begins September 1, 2012 and entrants have to November 30, 2012 to submit work. The cost is nominal, $15 per image, and signed personal and property releases are required where photograph contains people or notable artworks or buildings within image. While these rules may seem restricting, they are intended to protect the rights of subjects for publication purposes.

To see the entire collection of images I submitted visit for One Life, visit: http://mwaage.see.me/onelife2012#.UDj3xsNvLvY.tumblr

Have you used online resources to promote your work? Contests are just one  way to get work seen. Personal web sites and posting updates to social networking sites like Facebook are efforts at marketing that at its core say, ‘look at me’ and that’s precisely what you want to do for your work.

A new site I just discovered is The Ground Magazine.  Artists signing up to the site can upload their work. Exposure opportunities like this are a good alternatives for gaining visibility within a like-minded creative community. To repeat the Lotto catch phrase – “You have to be in it to win it.”

Something In The Air

In case you haven’t noticed I like clouds. I thought about doing a collection of photographs that featured different kinds of clouds. The idea isn’t new and multimedia artist and photographer Kelly DeLay already had his Cloud 365 Project underway. DeLay seeks to do something creative every day and capturing the ever changing variety of billowy vapor shapes is a site worth seeing if you too like looking at the light and formations that speckle the skies.

The effect looking upward at an expanse of space can be a overall good sense of being. I feel more grounded after taking the time to watch a changing pattern of clouds as they move through the atmosphere. It’s similar to watching water break across a shoreline. Something about feeling your place on earth or communing with nature comes to mind.

I don’t want to forget how simple it is to take in the sights around me. It’s ironic because there’s nothing to wait for except the next change you observe, as opposed to a Facebook feed where your attention is channelled in a much more mindless way.

Observing nature isn’t as draining as internet surfing. It’s a much more relaxed use of time in my opinion. It doesn’t matter if someone else has claimed the idea – to observe and record. In fact I can appreciate DeLay’s project. It is a document of time and learning. Something that doesn’t really ever depreciate.

I went to New York today and just looked at the sky above the city. It was a cloud filled sky that changed over the course of the day.

Portions of clouds broke away to reveal a solid tone of blue underneath. Shapes contrasted against the sky reminding me of what seemed obvious – the development of land vs. space.

Street lights brightened the night sky. Looking across the East River from Long Island City, the buildings looked like jewelry sparkling onto landscape.

There’s also a Facebook page dedicated solely to clouds, in case you’d like to see images from a variety of sources. Anyone can upload to the page.  What do you find yourself photographing over and over again?

To Tweak Or Not To Tweak: What constitutes good Art photography?

Photography and post production are two parts of a skill set that can result in fortifying a creative concept when it comes to achieving beautiful imagery. Or so some would have you think.

Traditionally photography was always about capturing the moment. The emphasis was on the act of using the camera as a tool to record the exposure. To do that effectively,  a science process was employed. Measuring the light combined with correct film development made photography a two-part equation: a) exposing the film material and b) developing the film and print materials.bjo

In CNN’s blog titled, ‘Art photography: When ‘reality isn’t good enough’ writer Ashley Strickland talks about the rise of digital manipulation in photography and infers the question, ‘What constitutes art when it comes to photography?’ Strickland interviews commercial photographer David Allen Brandt.

From Brandt’s point of view, a photographer should try to make an optimal image in camera, that is to say, when shooting the subject matter. Years ago before digital memory cards replaced films such as Kodachrome and TriX,  the professional photographer distinguished him or herself from consumer photography with the use of extensive lighting knowledge.

Pedestrian or ubiquitous photographic works today flood the visual landscape. It’s hard to decipher if the image maker is a professional – someone who makes income from their works, and more importantly, if they are good.

From what appears as original photography seen on Facebook or Tumblr,  I might call pedestrian photography. I mean ‘pedestrian’ in the sense of frequent and over abundant snapshot-like photos. I do not mean to diminish the quality unecessarily, but to emphasize the quantity of photographic works that have resulted since the impact of digital apparatus, cameras and computers. The use of software technologies to enhance what might otherwise be a straight forward image, has also contributed to a proliferation of imagery.

The question then becomes, as Strickland so simply states, “What happens (to photography) when you can do anything?”

That question implies: manipulating a photograph changes the inherent representation, (and I say this questionably), of what, reality? I think the writer refers to what is understood in a general sense, that an unmanipulated image, like a quick snapshot, appears as an unbiased recording of a moment.  But this too I find questionable because any image whether intended to be unbiased or not, is taken from the point of view of the taker and therefore somewhat subjective.

Isn’t the point of any creative visual endeavor to pursue the limits of the medium in a manner that bests explores the intent of the maker?

Initially what piqued my interest in Strickland’s article was the title, ‘Art Photography: When ‘reality isn’t good enough’ because it seemed to say, photography which is perceived as a medium that captures reality, is in fact misleading. I think the point being made was that straight, unmanipulated photography is a more accurate record of capturing what appears to be real, as opposed to images that are obviously manipulated. That would have been a more accurate statement.

This is made clear in the popular Instagram app. Take for instance these two images below. The first image is taken through the Droid mobile device with no adjustments made to the exposure.

In the second, the same image is manipulated using the Instagram app.  Does one image appeal more to the eye than the other? Does the use of the manipulation make the source image seem less interesting in comparison?

Both images are neutral subject matter. Some would say the 2nd is more interesting because the contrast is deeper, resulting in an overall effect of drama.

Would you say if using software increased the interest level of an otherwise boring image, and is just part of employing a processing workflow? Or do you think relying on software defeats the purpose of getting good images in camera?

The tools one uses to get to an end result, I think, is a personal choice, similar to that of framing a view with camera in hand and making selective decisions when to click the shutter. That is just as personal a choice as using Photoshop or Instagram. I don’t think relying on any one tool is going to be the answer to making better pictures overall. A combination of composition, lighting, and tweaking are all ok to use as long as you, the image maker, is pleased with the result.

What do you think – to tweak, or not to tweak? Should there be rules that define what constitutes art in photography?

What’s Mine Is Mine Unless I Share

March 1, 2014

Since writing this post I have been contacted by the photographer who asked me to remove it. I am also a photographer and feel copyright is an important issue. I wish Casey Keil every success. I do not wish to slander anyone or feel threatened because I expressed my opinion on the matter of how one photographer’s images wound up on another site. How it happened eludes me. If two professional photographers share a hard drive the files should be stored in separate directories. This is basic file management. If an administrator mistakenly posted works and attributed to the wrong person (as may be the case) I would hope the issue has been resolved. As written below in the original post, I spoke about screen grabs. That speculation was just that, a speculation how images can be grabbed from the screen and reposted somewhere else – I do not know what happened in the scenario that occurred between Keil and Falcetti. Again I hope this issue has been resolved.

I consider myself a reactionary person. I can cry at a moment’s notice. Every Friday at 8:25 a.m. NPR airs StoryCorps and as if on cue, the weight of world finds itself traveling down my cheek in the shape and feel of a wet teardrop.

It’s one thing to hear a stranger’s story and feel an emotional pull – from a ‘being human’ perspective. It’s quite another experience to hear a colleague’s complaint of finding his work  lifted by another, and feel outright outrage.

Being a professional photographer today is much harder than pre-digital days. A common misconception leads most to think otherwise. Film costs have absolutely disappeared and shooting hundreds of images has become relatively cost efficient with an initial investment of an 8-16 gigabyte film card.

Photographers have always had to be aware of licensing and copyright. A basis for any business is to price the product for the use, and that relationship is paramount to any professional service. The internet has provided a bigger audience for all media and while that serves to promote one’s work, it’s no secret that overzealous social networks can work against the very nature of ownership and rights to original content.

Digital versions of print editions of newspapers and magazines are what many publications are doing to sustain their businesses. That’s nothing new. Readership, is the end goal as is advertising dollars. When online sites become prey to ‘lifting’ images via screen grabs or when written content grabbing occurs without attribution, the line gets crossed between sharing and stealing.

Robert Falcetti found his photograph on Casey Keil’s site. There’s no doubt whatsoever that the original image belongs to Falcetti as shown in the photographer’s Photoshelter site. To see the images that were illegally claimed by Keil – click on the link to Facebook thread.

The image below appears on KCK Images site:

© Robert Falcetti

While I haven’t had the unpleasant experience of being so blatantly ripped off, I have had some of my own Facebook images turn up as gifts to others without even so much as a nod to me, the owner.

Lesson learned – Facebook is a social platform intentionally made for the purpose of sharing. If you, the owner of images do not want to share access to high quality files, don’t upload directly to Facebook. Post to secondary sites where you can control download permissions such as Flickr, Photoshelter, Smugmug, etc.

I suspect what happened to Falcetti cannot be avoided completely. Every computer whether MacIntosh or PC, has screen grab functionality. Because web viewing doesn’t require large resolutions, screen capture is easy enough to do and reproduce for similar presentation. The captured file wouldn’t be suitable for quality reproduction, but that is a small consolation when you see you image falsely claimed by another.

Sharing should be somewhat guarded in the age of digital reproduction. What measures do you take as a photographer, writer, artist or originator of any creative works, to ensure attribution, licensing and payment?